House leadership to shelve FAA overhaul

The GOP saw through Rep. Bill Shuster’s motives and his close relationship with A4A.

The House Republican leadership is shelving plans to pass an overhaul of the Federal Aviation Administration, a major blow to House Transportation Chairman Bill Shuster of Pennsylvania, according to multiple senior aides.

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Flake, McCain Introduce Bill Requiring Stakeholder Input on FAA Airspace Changes

Flake and McCain are on the ball.

Where are our NY senators?

U.S Sens. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) today introduced the Airspace Management Advisory Committee Act. The bill – which stems from the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) failure to engage with communities and airports before altering flight paths into Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport – would require the FAA to create an airspace management advisory committee to review and provide input on future significant airspace changes. The legislation builds on a recent bill by Flake and McCain to require the FAA to engage with communities and airports before altering flight paths.

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Shuster lounges poolside with airline lobbyists as he pursues FAA bill

It’s the latest example of the Transportation Committee chairman’s coziness with the airline industry.  The Airlines have the politicians in their back pocket, (or gets in bed with, literally).  Our politicians should have the citizen’s best interests top of mind.

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Enforceable Aviation Noise Standards Are Needed in the Aviation Innovation, Reform and Reauthorization Act of 2016

Taber has got it right.

Recognizing that aviation noise is a public health issue that can no longer be ignored, the Aviation Innovation, Reform and Reauthorization Act of 2016 (AIRR) contains several provisions that seem to address the problem of aviation noise. Section 614, for example, will increase community involvement in processes that may increase aviation noise. Section 604 requires the FAA to review the relationship between aircraft noise exposure and its effects on communities around airports. And Sections 137 requires the FAA to revisit its methodology for assessing aviation noise, while Section 138 requires the FAA to revisit certain actions for which a categorical exclusion was taken. These are steps forward in setting up a more responsive aviation noise regulatory framework. However, without enforceable aviation noise standards, these provisions mean very little.

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